Follow Us:

Sundance, Wyoming Chamber of Commerce

Site Search

Sundance, Wyoming Area Attractions

Area Attractions & Recreation

SUNDANCE WINTER RECREATION

Snowmobiling in the Bearlodge Mountains adjacent to Sundance is fun for the entire family!  Ride miles of easily accessed marked trails. Lodging, fuel and food is just minutes away!  Also enjoy our art gallery, shopping and learning about Sundance's history at our free Museum in the courhouse basement. See SPECIAL PACKAGES offered below! Wyoming law requires that all snowmobiles must have either a current Wyoming Resident or Nonresident user fee decal prominently displayed on the outside of each snowmobile. Each permit is thirty-five dollars and may be purchased at Off the Grid Sports, 204 Main Street or Rapid Stop Conoco, 20059 Hwy. 14. 

LODGING SNOWMOBILE PACKAGES:

Call the Best Western Sundance Inn at 307-283-2800 and ask for their "Special Snowmobiling Rate" of $79.99. Indoor pool, free breakfast and more awaits you in this friendly, clean hotel. Feel free to access their website for more facility details, but be sure to call them directly to get the special booking rate. Best Western Sundance Webpage

Bunkhouse Bed & Breakfast located SE of Sundance offers a western, ranch atmosphere with complete privacy. Share a typical, home-style breakfast with your hosts. Call 307-283-3542. Weblink

Access CURRENT TRAILS CONDITION Website

Access BEARLODGE and NORTHEAST WYOMING SNOWMOBILE TRAILS Map Publication Link

BEARLODGE SNOWMOBILE ASSOCIATION  Website

This Bear Lodge trail system is maintained through cooperative efforts of the Wyoming Department of State Parks & Cultural Resources, Division of State Parks, Historic Sites & Trails, the U.S. Forest Service, and local snowmobile clubs and trails. 
 
Seventy-eight miles of groomed, and 9 miles of ungroomed trails located north of Sundance. Machine services and repair available in Sundance. Food and lodging in Sundance and Hulett. Snow depths average 1 feet to 4 feet. 
 
Elevations: 5,000 feet to 7,000 feet
Season: December 15 through March 15 - WEATHER PERMITTING
Season Temperatures: +40° F to -20° F 
 

 bearlodge-mountains-snowmobiling


 

BEARLODGE MOUNTAIN RECREATION & black hills national forest (1 MILE)

atvs  bearlodge district

Motorized trail recreation in Wyoming is very popular. Many motorized activities take place in conjunction with non-motorized activities, such as camping, hunting and fishing, and the Bear Lodge area, including the Bearlodge Mountains are no exception. Permits are required are for all Off Road Vehicles and license plates if driving on any roads. Bearlodge Ranger District encompasses the northern portion of the Black Hills on the Wyoming side.  It is located in east central Crook County on approximately 170,000 acres. The District is unique because it contains large areas of hardwood forest as compared to other Ranger Districts.  Timber harvest and related silvicultural activity is the largest resource program on the district. The district has an office located in Sundance at 101 S. 21st Street. 307-283-1361. The Bearlodge Ranger District of the Black Hills National Forest boasts miles and miles of uncrowded trails with breathtaking views for the hiker, mountain biker or horseback rider. The Sundance trailhead are located within 1 mile of Sundance.
 

The Black Hills National Forest is in western South Dakota and northeastern Wyoming, covering an area 125 miles long and 65 miles wide. Enjoy yourself while viewing the many rugged rock formations, canyons and gulches, open grassland parks, tumbling streams, and deep blue lakes. Millions of visitors come to the Black Hills each year to experience the rich and diverse heritage. In the immediate vicinity is trout fishing, access to over 300 miles of snowmobile trails, hunting, hiking and camping. Forest Service campgrounds near Sundance are Cook Lake, Reuter, and Sundance Trailhead. Game species on the district include white-tailed and mule deer, Rocky Mountain elk, Merriam’s turkey and Ruffed grouse. 

 
Please remember to Tread Lightly© and carry a current travel management map or land use map from the land managing agency. It is your responsibility to know local land management allowances and restrictions. 
 
 
ORV Permits. In Sundance, permits may be purchased at Off the Grid Sports (Inside Dillon's Hardware), Crook County Treasurer and at Rapid Stop Conoco. 
 

Wyoming Off-Road Vehicles & Trails Page

ATV's and Hunting BrochurePDF Document

Wyoming 2011-12 Off -Road Vehicle Program Informational Brochure PDF Document

 Black Hills National Forest

Devils Tower National Monument (28 Miles)

Devils Tower rises above the surrounding grassland and Ponderosa pine forests like a rocky sentinel. Northern Plains tribes have worshipped near this remarkable geologic formation for thousands of years. Fur trappers, explorers, and settlers alike were awed by the tower's majesty. In 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt established Devils Tower as our nation's first national monument.

The site is considered Sacred to the Lakota and other tribes that have a connection to the area. Hundreds of parallel cracks make it one of the finest traditional crack climbing areas in North America. Devils Tower entices us to explore and define our place in the natural and cultural world.

Web Site

Devils Tower National Monument


The Vore Buffalo Jump (12 miles)

The Vore Buffalo Jump is one of the most important archaeological sites of the late-prehistoric plains Indians. Discovered during the construction of Highway I-90 in the early 1970's, the Vore site is a natural sinkhole that was used as a bison trap from about 1500 to 1800 A.D.

Buffalo were driven over the edge of the sink hole as a method for the Native American tribes to procure the large quantities of meat and hides needed to survive the harsh prairie winters. The Vore Buffalo Jump was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on April 11th 1973.

Web Site

vore buffalo jump 


INYAN KARA (20 Miles)

 

Translated from Lakota as "Rock Gatherer," Inyan Kara is listed on the National Register for Historic Places because of its cultural importance. It is recognized by the Lakota people as sacred to mothers giving birth. Inyan Kara is also known as one of General Custer’s stops on his expedition through the Black Hills in 1874, and stands as a landmark to early travelers and explorers in the region, with the mountain reaching 5,348 feet.

Inyan Kara is located in the Black Hills of northeast Wyoming. While it is located on U.S. Forest Service land, access is limited. Private property must be crossed to reach Inyan Kara, so access is only obtained via the landowner’s permission. There are multiple routes to climb the summit, as there is no permanent trail on the mountain; therefore climbers ascend at their own risk.

Inyan Kara is located in Crook County, WY and can be viewed from County Road 585. For more information, contact the Bearlodge District Ranger Office at (307) 283-1361.

Web Site

Inyan Kara Mountain


Keyhole State Park (23 Miles)

Keyhole is a mecca for both resident and migrating birds of all species. Visitors also have the opportunity to enjoy a variety of other wildlife, including mule deer, pronghorn antelope and wild turkeys. There is a marina located on the headquarters side of the lake and operated by a concessionaire. The concessionaire has pop, alcohol, groceries, bait, tackle, fishing licenses and 10 electric campsites that he reserves. There is a public boat ramp at the marina.

Keyhole Offers Many Attractions and is located on the western edge of the famed Black Hills, between Sundance and Moorcroft, and is easily accessed off I-90 at exit 165 or take exits 153 or 154 in Moorcroft then Hwy 14 north six miles then Hwy 113. Within sight of Devils Tower, Keyhole State Park is situated along the southeast shore of Keyhole Reservoir and offers excellent fishing for walleye, catfish, small mouth bass and northern pike.

Keyhole State Park is open year around and offers nine campgrounds that are all overlooking the lake. There are more than 170 sites with tables and grills. Most of the sites will handle large R.V.'s and trailers.

Web Site

Keyhole State Park


Spearfish Canyon (32 Miles)

Spearfish Canyon is a deep but narrow gorge carved by Spearfish Creek just south of Spearfish, South Dakota in the U.S. It is located on the northern edge of Black Hills National Forest. Many tourists drive through the canyon, drawn to the region due to its wide range of plant and wildlife, geology, rock formations, and waterfalls. Spearfish Creek holds populations of rainbow and brown trout and is dammed in several spots, affording fishing opportunities. Stocking of trout in Spearfish Creek was discontinued in the 1970's and all trout in the creek today are wild. In addition, remnants of Spearfish Canyon's active mining history are still easily found in some locations.

Web Site

Spearfish Canyon


Thunder Basin National Grassland (50 Miles)

The Thunder Basin National Grassland is located in northeastern Wyoming in the Powder River Basin between the Big Horn Mountains and the Black Hills. Elevation on the national grassland ranges from 3,600 to 5,200 feet, and the climate is semi-arid.

The national grassland provides unique opportunities for recreation, including hiking, sightseeing, hunting, and fishing. There are no developed campgrounds; however, dispersed camping is allowed.

The national grassland abounds with wildlife year-round, provides forage for livestock, and is underlain with vast mineral resources.

Web Site

Thunder Basin National Grassland


Crazy Horse Memorial (80 miles)

The Crazy Horse Memorial is a mountain monument complex that is under construction on privately held land in the Black Hills, in Custer County, South Dakota. It represents Crazy Horse, an Oglala Lakota warrior, riding a horse and pointing into the distance. The memorial was commissioned by Lakota elder Henry Standing Bear to be sculpted by Korczak Ziółkowski. It is operated by the Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation, a private non-profit organization. The Memorial's mission is to honor the culture, tradition and living heritage of North American Indians.

The memorial consists of the mountain carving (monument), the Indian Museum of North America, and the Native American Cultural Center. The monument is being carved out of Thunderhead Mountain on land considered sacred by some Oglala Lakota, between Custer and Hill City, roughly 17 miles from Mount Rushmore.

Web Site

Crazy Horse Memorial


Custer State Park (88 miles)

The clear mountain waters are inviting, and the open ranges are waiting to be discovered. Bring your family to Custer State Park, and let yourself run wild. A herd of 1,300 bison roams freely throughout the park, often stopping traffic along the 18-mile Wildlife Loop Road. The herd is one of the largest publically-owned herds in the world.

Custer State Park in the Black Hills encompasses 71,000 acres of spectacular terrain and an abundance of wildlife. Within the park, you'll discover a world of adventure!

Web Site

Custer State Park


Mount Rushmore (90 miles)

Mount Rushmore National Memorial is visited by nearly three million people each year that come to marvel at the majestic beauty of the Black Hills of South Dakota and learn about the birth, growth, development and preservation of the country. From the history of the first inhabitants to the diversity of America today, Mount Rushmore brings visitors face to face with the rich heritage we all share.

Web Site

Mount Rushmore